RSGB Tonight @ 8 Video – Getting started on QO-100

RSGB Tonight @ 8 Video – Getting started on QO-100

Dom Smith M0BLF gave an online talk – Getting started on QO-100as part of the RSGB Tonight @ 8 live webinar series.

Dom’s lockdown project was to complete a set up for the QO-100 amateur radio transponders that are hosted on the geostationary satellite Es’hail-2. This was the first amateur radio payload to be put into a geostationary orbit and provides constant and reliable coverage for amateur voice, data and television contacts over the whole of Africa, Europe and the Middle East and even as far as Brazil in the west, and Thailand in the east.

Getting started on QO-100 is a talk in two halves: first we’ll watch the video, showing the particular set-up chosen—and there are many!—and then there will be chance for a Q&A.

Watch Getting Started on QO-100 by Dom Smith, M0BLF

Dom Smith, M0BLF has been a radio amateur for nearly 25 years since being licensed at the age of 14 in 1996. He is an active member of the Camb-Hams and Cambridge University Wireless Society (CUWS), and may often be heard contesting, climbing hills for Summits on the Air, and assisting Cambridgeshire RAYNET. He also enjoys travelling for DXPeditions, most recently as JW/M0BLF, VP2MUW and ZC4UW, and he manages QSL cards for most CUWS trips. On top of all that, he volunteers with Cambridge 105 Radio, the local community broadcast station, on the engineering team.

Professionally, Dom works as a Cloud Solutions Architect in the software team at the Royal Society of Chemistry and he holds a PhD in Hispanic Studies.

Watch other RSGB Tonight @ 8 videos at https://www.youtube.com/user/TheRSGB/videos

QO-100 information https://amsat-uk.org/satellites/geo/eshail-2/

QO-100 products in the AMSAT-UK shop https://amsat-uk.org/

Get The Details…

m5aka

AMSAT-UK

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ISS MAI-75 SSTV activity planned for Aug 4-5

ISS MAI-75 SSTV activity planned for Aug 4-5

https://twitter.com/ESA__Education/status/1281140713237946370

Apollo–Soyuz was the first international space mission, carried out jointly by the United States and the Soviet Union in mid-July 1975.

http://ariss-sstv.blogspot.com/

The ISS puts out a strong signal on 145.800 MHz FM and a 2m handheld with a 1/4 wave antenna will be enough to receive it. Many FM mobile and base station rigs can be switched been wide and narrow deviation FM filters. For best results you should select the filter for wider deviation FM (25 kHz channel spacing). Handhelds all seem to have a single wide filter fitted as standard.

The space agency ESA has released a video ‘How to get pictures from the International Space Station via Amateur Radio’ along with a collection of Tutorial videos explaining how to receive ISS Slow Scan TV (SSTV) pictures for different computers and mobile devices
https://amsat-uk.org/2020/07/08/esa-promote-amateur-radio-iss-sstv/

Read the Raspberry Pi article Pictures from space via ham radio
https://www.raspberrypi.org/magpi/pictures-from-space-via-ham-radio/

ISS SSTV info and links https://amsat-uk.org/beginners/iss-sstv/

What is Amateur Radio? http://www.essexham.co.uk/what-is-amateur-radio

Free UK amateur radio online training course https://www.essexham.co.uk/train/foundation-online/

Get The Details…

m5aka

AMSAT-UK

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Ofcom statement on 5725-5850 MHz

Ofcom statement on 5725-5850 MHz

On Friday, July 24, Ofcom released their statement on 5725-5850 MHz and 5925-6425 MHz.

The main points are:
• Make 5925-6425 MHz available for Wi-Fi and other RLAN technologies
• The release of this spectrum will also enable very low power (VLP) outdoor use
• Remove the Dynamic Frequency Selection (DFS) requirements from channels used by Wi-Fi in the 5725-5850 MHz Amateur and Amateur Satellite Service allocation band

The Amateur Satellite Service weak-signal downlink band, 5830-5850 MHz, is used by amateur payloads on Deep-Space and Interplanetary spacecraft as well as by satellites in Low Earth Orbit (LEO). Increased use of Wi-Fi across these frequencies could obliterate the weak amateur satellite signals.

Ofcom statement
https://www.ofcom.org.uk/consultations-and-statements/category-2/improving-spectrum-access-for-wi-fi

In 2013 CEPT looked at increased use of 5725-5850 MHz
https://amsat-uk.org/2013/08/29/cept-considers-use-of-5830-5850-mhz-satellite-band/

Wi-Fi Channels in the 5 GHz Band

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m5aka AMSAT-UK

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AMSAT Partners with UMaine’s WiSe-Net Lab to Develop MESAT1 CubeSat

AMSAT Partners with UMaine’s WiSe-Net Lab to Develop MESAT1 CubeSat

CubeSat in Space - Image Credit University of Maine WiSe-Lab

CubeSat in Space – Image Credit University of Maine WiSe-Lab

The University of Maine Wireless Sensing Laboratory (WiSe-Net Lab) and AMSAT have signed an agreement to collaborate on building and operating MESAT1, Maine’s first small satellite, to be launched in space in the next three years.

MESAT1 is Maine’s first CubeSat — one of 18 small research satellites selected by NASA to carry auxiliary payloads into space between 2021–23. It is part of NASA’s CubeSat Launch Initiative that provides opportunities for nanosatellite science and technology payloads built by universities, schools and nonprofit organizations to ride share on space launches.

UMaine’s WiSe-Net Lab, established in 2005, is involved in aerospace and space research. The lab was founded by Ali Abedi, KB1VJV, assistant vice president for research and director of the Center for Undergraduate Research. Lab researchers have developed the first wireless sensor network for NASA’s lunar habitation project and launched wireless leak-detection to the International Space station.

The MESAT1 initiative will enable K–12 students and teachers in Maine to access space data for educational and research purposes, and encourage students to pursue STEM careers.

AMSAT will provide a Linear Transponder Module (LTM) along with integration and operational support for MESAT1. AMSAT’s LTM incorporates a VHF/UHF telemetry beacon, command receiver, and linear transponder. It will be available for radio amateurs worldwide to use when the satellite is commissioned.

AMSAT President Clayton Coleman, W5PFG, celebrated the announcement.
“This is a great day for AMSAT and UMaine’s Wise-Net Lab. This partnership is a true win-win for both education and the amateur radio community. The collaborative effort under AMSAT’s engineering and operations teams has once again succeeded to bring another opportunity to AMSAT.”

[ANS thanks AMSAT and UMaine’s WiSe-Net Lab for the above information]

AMSAT News Service https://www.amsat.org/mailman/listinfo/ans

NASA selects Maine’s first small research satellite for launch in next three years
https://umaine.edu/news/blog/2020/02/24/nasa-selects-maines-first-small-research-satellite-for-launch-in-next-three-years/

Maine’s CubeSat research satellite mission
https://mainecampus.com/2020/03/maines-cubesat-research-satellite-mission-scheduled-for-launch-in-2021/

Get The Details…
m5aka AMSAT-UK

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UWE-4 News: Successful first demonstration of orbit control on a 1U CubeSat

UWE-4 News: Successful first demonstration of orbit control on a 1U CubeSat

Altitude of UWE-4 since launch on December 27, 2018

Altitude of UWE-4 since launch on December 27, 2018

The University Wuerzburg Experimental Satellite 4 (UWE-4) successfully used its propulsion system in order to conduct orbit control. The 1U CubeSat, developed and built at the Chair for Robotics and Telematics, is equipped with the electric propulsion system NanoFEEP which has been developed by TU Dresden.

UWE-4 LogoSeveral manoeuvres have been performed within 11 days between June 23rd – July 3rd 2020 such that the altitude of the CubeSat was reduced by more than 100 m, compared to an average of 21 m with natural decay. This marks the first time in CubeSat history that a 1U CubeSat changed its orbit using an on-board propulsion system.

As chance would have it, the team of UWE-4 received a conjunction data message (CDM) in the morning of July 2nd 2020 from the United Air Force’s 18th Space Control Squadron. A conjunction of UWE-4 with a non-operational Iridium satellite (ID: 34147) in the morning of July 5th 2020 with a minimum range of about 800 m was a threat to the safety of UWE-4. An analysis has shown that the altitude of UWE-4 would already be below the Iridium satellite at the time of conjunction. Thus the on-going altitude lowering manoeuvre could only improve the situation and can be considered as a collision avoidance manoeuvre. No further CDMs have been issued regarding this possible conjunction. An analysis of the orbit of the two spacecraft after July 5th 2020 results in a closest approach of more than 6000 m.

Lowering the altitude of a spacecraft in low earth orbit (LEO) is equivalent to a reduction of its lifetime, since satellites in LEO usually burn up during re-entry due to the friction with the Earth’s atmosphere. Thus, this experiment is a concept demonstration of a de-orbiting manoeuvre shown at the smallest class of spacecraft in LEO. Today, there is no commitment to carry a propulsion system for spacecraft. However, due to the vastly increasing number of satellites in mega constellations such obligations are being discussed in the space agencies of several space faring countries. The experiment of UWE-4 presents a de-orbiting solution for the fraction of space debris of operational but unused satellites of today and for the mega constellations of tomorrow.

Stay tuned for more updates on UWE-4 and the upcoming launch of NetSat – a formation flying nano-satellite mission from our partner institute Center for Telematics which is expected to be launched September 2020!

Kind regards,

The UWE‑4 Team

UWE-4: First NanoFEEP thruster ignition
https://amsat-uk.org/2019/03/04/uwe-4-first-nanofeep-thruster-ignition/

UWE-4 435.600 MHz
http://www7.informatik.uni-wuerzburg.de/forschung/space-exploration/projects/uwe-4/

Get The Details…
m5aka AMSAT-UK

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